Atomicpanda

wilwheaton:

I’m starting to see why GamerGate has so many useful idiots, when I read things like this, and get to see one of them in action.

See, I link to an interesting, insightful, long read at Medium that discusses the lack of racial slurs that are used to describe white people. I comment that this article is “great”, and this genius declares that I “support indiscriminate bullying”, based on either this idiot’s lack of reading comprehension, or a willful distortion of the meaning of my words.

Either way, these are the useful idiots who are keeping GamerGate alive.

OMG Wil! You called him an idiot. You’re such a bully! /unfollow

(Because so many gamergaters don’t get sarcasm, that was sarcasm)

kada-bura:

Oh my god please watch this video please.

Truly amazing. “Professional” game developer threatens to kill the head of Steam because his game wasn’t listed properly (probably a glitch from the looks of it). 


More amazing, people actually defend him in the comments in this article and on twitter, etc. “Well, it’s pretty clear he didn’t mean it.” “To be fair, it was costing him sales.” “It’s not like he was in any real danger.” “The first few angry tweets were OK-ish.” 


No. C’mon. There is this thing called reality, and like it or not, we’re all in it. Maybe in your own world having a twitter meltdown, which includes death threats, is the proper way to go about things, but here in the real world, we make a couple phone calls, or maybe send a polite email, and get the problem sorted out. 


If you’re a professional *anything* there is no excuse for this kind of behavior. And it’s frankly sad that so many gamers don’t see a twitter tirade as unprofessional behavior. I guess he just did what they would have done? 


For those who have lost touch with reality here’s a tip, talking shit in a game is not the same as talking shit in real life.

Speaking of more of that neat Trigger animation…

Speaking of more of that neat Trigger animation…

greathdips:

ririmon:

this just happened on my dashboard and i just

the turtle does not give a fuck about misato
it does the bend and snap in the face of anime

I love it when posts sync up on Tumblr. I’ve had a few, but none as good as this. 

greathdips:

ririmon:

this just happened on my dashboard and i just

the turtle does not give a fuck about misato

it does the bend and snap in the face of anime

I love it when posts sync up on Tumblr. I’ve had a few, but none as good as this. 

Speaking of that neat Trigger animation… 

Speaking of that neat Trigger animation… 

Giving this series a shot. Made by Trigger (Little Witch Academia, Kill la Kill), so it’s bound to be pretty, animation-wise. 
Two episodes in, it— has potential. It’s silly and funny, which is good. I’m not a fan of the whole harem anime setup (I’m old. I’ve seen this for decades) or the various instances of fan-servicey boob jiggles (though there haven’t been many yet), but over all it’s pretty OK. Granted, all the characters seem to be fairly cliche, but again, only two episodes in so far. 
If nothing else, I’ll bet it will look good.
http://www.crunchyroll.com/when-supernatural-battles-became-commonplace

Giving this series a shot. Made by Trigger (Little Witch Academia, Kill la Kill), so it’s bound to be pretty, animation-wise. 

Two episodes in, it— has potential. It’s silly and funny, which is good. I’m not a fan of the whole harem anime setup (I’m old. I’ve seen this for decades) or the various instances of fan-servicey boob jiggles (though there haven’t been many yet), but over all it’s pretty OK. Granted, all the characters seem to be fairly cliche, but again, only two episodes in so far. 

If nothing else, I’ll bet it will look good.

http://www.crunchyroll.com/when-supernatural-battles-became-commonplace

wilwheaton:

(via Cartoon: The house of feeeaaaarrrr)
We never say that all men deserve to feel beautiful. We never say that each man is beautiful in his own way. We don’t have huge campaigns aimed at young boys trying to convince them that they’re attractive, probably because we very rarely correlate a man’s worth with his appearance. The problem is that a woman’s value in this world is still very much attached to her appearance, and telling her that she should or deserves to feel beautiful does more to promote that than negate it. Telling women that they “deserve” to feel pretty plays right in to the idea that prettiness should be important to them. And having books and movies aimed at young women where every female protagonist turns out to be beautiful (whereas many of the antagonists are described in much less flattering terms) reinforces the message that beauty has some kind of morality attached to it, and that all heroines are somehow pretty.